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Ibrik Recipes

An Ibrik can be used to brew coffee in a variety of ways – this is a quick catalogue of the recipes I use.

Broadly Traditional:

For 1 large cup (2 demitasse cups) –
12 – 14g of freshly roasted coffee, ground very very fine (should be consistency of seived flour).
2 demitasse cups of room cold water (~room temp)

1) Put the water into the ibrik
2) Add the coffee whilst stirring the water – make sure it isn’t forming clumps of grounds and appears well mixed.
3) Place ibrik on a low heat. Only trial and error will reveal the exact temperature required, but you should aim to heat the water to a simmer in about 6 – 10 minutes.
4) Watch. Don’t stir or otherwise disturb the coffee at this point. You should see is gradually form a surface skin of very tiny bubbles. This will then start to rise up slightly, and then slight larger bubbles will break through this skin. These bubbles should still be small, and should spread out and begin to foam up in the ibrik.
5) When the bubbles near the top of the ibrik, remove from the heat and serve immediately.

Variations – Many traditional methods pour off some of the foam at the end, then leave the rest in the ibrik and return this to the heat. It is heated to foam up once or twice more. With slow, gentle heating I don’t find this necessary for a pleasant foam, and find it detracts from flavour (due to over extraction).

Sugar & Spice:
I’m not a fan of flavouring my coffees, but sugar and spices (esp. Cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice) can be added at the start, along with the ground coffee. Otherwise, the recipe is the same as the Broadly Traditional above.

Blueberry Fruit Coffee:
This was my 2010 UKCIC Speciality Drink entry.

For 1 large cup (2 demitasse cups) –
12 – 14g of freshly roasted coffee, ground very very fine (should be consistency of seived flour). I used HasBean Washed Wahana, but another coffee with strong berry notes would do.
2 demitasse cups of room cold water (~room temp)
1) Put the water into the ibrik.
2) Add the coffee whilst stirring the water – make sure it isn’t forming clumps of grounds and appears well mixed.
3) Add 3 – 4 blueberries to the ibrik.
4) Place ibrik on a low heat. Only trial and error will reveal the exact temperature required, but you should aim to heat the water to a simmer in about 6 – 10 minutes.
5) Set up a filter over a spare ibrik or jug – I used a Hario V60, but any other paper/cloth filter would be equally good.
5) Watch. Don’t stir or otherwise disturb the coffee at this point. You should see is gradually form a surface skin of very tiny bubbles. This will then start to rise up slightly, and then slight larger bubbles will break through this skin. These bubbles should still be small, and should spread out and begin to foam up in the ibrik.
6) Remove ibrik from heat. Pour off about half the liquid into the filter.
7) Half fill a glass with the filtered liquid, and top up from the ibrik.

The end result emphasises the fruit flavours of the coffee, which the ibrik method is already sympatheic to. Part filtering cleans up the taste slightly and creates a mouthfeel similar to fresh fruit juice.

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